President Obama Reveals His Picks for IES Board - Inside School Research - Education Week

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President Obama Reveals His Picks for IES Board

By Debra Viadero on February 25, 2010 9:29 AM --> | 1 Comment | No TrackBacks
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President Obama on Tuesday announced his picks to fill some long-empty seats on the National Board for Education Sciences.

And, as they say at the Oscars, the nominees are:
Deborah Loewenberg Ball, dean of the education school at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Adam Gamoran, a professor of sociology and educational policy studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and director of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research; Bridget Terry Long, professor of education and economics at the Harvard University Graduate School of Education; and Margaret R. (Peggy) McLeod, executive director of student services and special education in the Alexandria City Public Schools in Virginia.

These selections are long overdue. Created to advise the federal Institute of Education Sciences on education research matters, the 15-member board has been hobbling along with six members for nearly a year and even had to postpone one meeting for lack of a quorum. But the wait isn't yet over. The nominations have yet to be approved by Congress.

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Full disclosure: This is a story of interest to me as an IES-funded graduate student.

It's good to know that the Obama Administration is getting around to this matter, especially given the large amounts of stimulus money that have dedicated to education and education research.

I am not familiar with most of the nominees, but they seem to have diverse backgrounds and areas of expertise. One researcher I do know, Deborah Ball, is a great pick in my humble opinion. While my exposure to her work has been limited, my impression is that she brings a level of practical, theoretical and methodological rigor to the table.

Keeping an eye on this...